Clever application: a grid of SSD’s (y’know, the digital number 8) used as a lo-fi display and/or mirror.

Teehan+Lax Labs – D.I.G.I.T..

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Man and machine unite to explore the impossible depths of projection art | The Verge.

From San Francisco studio Bot & Dolly, this has got to be a new standard in projection mapping. Robotic arms move projection screens around, creating very convincing 3D illusions. The whole time I was watching it I kept thinking of the Arthur C. Clarke quote, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,” and there it was on the screen at the end.

There is a recursive real-vs-reproduced phenomemon at work here. The illusion works, mostly, because the camera is also on a robotic arm, allowing the point of view to align with the projection’s perspective. Standing anywhere else would break the illusion (like in magic). So while we are in awe that this work of art is being captured 100% “in camera” (no post-processing), the whole work of art does not in fact exist outside of the camera. When you compare it to a magic trick–a fair comparison given the quote they show at the end–it actually comes out looking a little weak. If Lance Burton‘s tricks only worked if you stood in one place, would we think he was so great? Not conceptually any different from David Copperfield making the Statue of Liberty disappear. I felt swindled when I watched it live on TV and have always hated him for that.

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“Trace Your Road” for Lexus Italy (Saatchi & Saatchi Italy, Movie Magic International, LOGAN & Fake Love) | NOTCOT

Oh wow this is fun. Draw a path on an iPad–while riding shotgun with an F1 driver–and feel the G’s.

Fake Love, by the way, did the “Buy the world a Coke” refresh. Take a look. I like these guys. And what a perfect name.

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Last Launch. Discovery, Endeavour, Atlantis – we make money not art.

Regine reviews the above-mentioned book by photographer Dan Winters–one of the few photogs allowed to photograph the last shuttle lift-offs, and a fantastically gifted one at that.

His photo of the Vertical Assembly Building, one of my favorite buildings (it has its own weather inside), is too cool for words.

That reminds me, take a look at this Cloudscapes installation by Tetsuo Kondo and Transsolar. They put a cloud in a glass box, and you can walk through it. Sounds about as interesting than the Rain Room.

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Watch fifty disco balls create a room full of beautiful static mapped out with 3D modeling | The Verge.

Kyle McDonald and Jonas Jongejan’s Light Leaks. Projectors shine on disco balls, and a camera maps where the reflections are in 3d, allowing them to program full-room projections.

How and what else.

I love the idea of breaking pixels apart. It’s like DLP smashed. Now, what if instead of mirrors you used prisms? Instead of discrete dots, how about smeared light, i.e. vectors?

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Niklas Roy: Instant Art Career.

People-powered paintbrush on pulleys. A charming quasi-cynical installation (I say “quasi” because it is actually very cheery) on the state of commercialized art.

Another example of more low-tech, greater joy.

via MAKE

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“aboriginal landscapes of fabulous hybrid creatures” | MetaFilter.

All the links you need to be blown away by Marguerite Humeau and her working reconstructions of extinct creatures’ vocal tracts.

If you only have time for one click, go to this interview.

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Murmur.

The sound of your voice splattered on a wall with light, by Chevalvert, 2roqs, Polygraphik, and Splank. [If you can’t tell, those are names of French studios.]

A pretty visualization. I like the illusion of slowing audio down so that you can see it transmitted along a cable.

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MIT Creates Cloud-Like Silk Pavilion With the Help of 6,500 Silkworms! | Inhabitat – Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building.

Look closely–the worms are still there.

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The witty designs of Phil Jones. Go ahead, try not to laugh.

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