I am impressed with this very smart, outrageous concept, one that only a group like the Wu-Tang Clan could pull off. No matter what happens now, it is done. The statement has been made, the art is born. Your move, world.

Wu-Tang Clan will sell only a single copy of their new album

They recorded in secret and plan to tour the album in galleries and other places for listening events. Then it gets sold, and the owner can do whatever he or she wants to do with it–sit on it, sell it, distribute it for free, or something possibly even more radical.

“The idea that music is art has been something we advocated for years,” says RZA. “And yet it doesn’t receive the same treatment as art in the sense of the value of what it is, especially nowadays when it’s been devalued and diminished to almost the point that it has to be given away for free.” Whether or not Wu-Tang Clan is able to find enough people who want to go experience their album in a museum to make an impact remains to be seen — as does the viability of a multi-million dollar unique pressing of that album, but the group is OK with its plan going awry. “It might totally flop, and we might be completely ridiculed,” says co-producer Tarik “Cilvaringz” Azzougarh. “But the essence and core of our ideas is to inspire creation and originality and debate, and save the music album from dying.”

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Core77 has a short post on The Hoffman Dovetail Key, what appears to be a simple, elegant and compact system for dovetailing wood parts together.

For those not grasping it right away, this system can enable an absolutely radical change in your production system. Consider that items joined with these HD Keys require no glue, no glue-up, no cleaning up the squeeze-out, no clamps, no drying time. Finished pieces can be stacked as soon as they’re together with no worries about glue squeeze-out from one piece marring the one beneath it, obviating the need for racks.

I’ve been saying “biscuit joiner” when people ask me what my favorite tool is (they do ask, I don’t know why). I might have to change my answer now.

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One photographer’s journey against the bias of film made for white people. Well worth a slow and careful read.

Teaching The Camera To See My Skin

 

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I’ve always found mathematics beautiful. And I’ve always, or nearly always, felt that it was taught poorly. Too much time spent trying to get to the answer and almost no appreciation for the poetic magnificence around it. I saw this discussion on StackExchange and fell back in love with math all over again:

Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain

Just a little while ago I read about Moebius Noodles, [article in The Atlantic] a book (a movement?) that shares this love of math and honestly, to the core, believes that all children can learn to love math, too. It has to do with how we talk about it.

An excerpt:

“Calculations kids are forced to do are often so developmentally inappropriate, the experience amounts to torture,” she says. They also miss the essential point—that mathematics is fundamentally about patterns and structures, rather than “little manipulations of numbers,” as she puts it. It’s akin to budding filmmakers learning first about costumes, lighting and other technical aspects, rather than about crafting meaningful stories.

 

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Regenerative braking for bicycles and more. Intelligent power boost while you pedal, Wifi connection, API for developers… This is pretty great stuff, but now someone has to figure out a bulletproof way to lock your rear wheel.

MIT Actually Reinvented The Wheel – Digg.

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Very nice interactive showing the trajectory of Comet ISON. Move through space in 3d, start and stop the timeline and even switch to Earth perspective to see where the comet will be in the sky. I especially like that they show the planets rotating as they orbit the sun–because the timeline is moving many days per second, it’s like the planets are spinning tops.

Sun Moon Scope.

If you just can’t stand simulations and want to see the real thing–that is, Earth, viewed from space–check this out:

Watch Earth Spin From Your Browser

With the aid of Russian space authorities, Vancouver-based UrtheCast (pronounced “earthcast”) will launch two cameras into orbit today (Nov. 25) with the immediate goal of streaming images of the Earth back home in near-real time.

UrtheCast

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Online art: a shared canvas for anyone to make their mark. Rendered as a sphere.

The instant a touch is made, things are set in motion. Make a drawing to reach out and be touched. Drawing together we are drawn together. This is how we make a difference in the world, on micro and macro levels, individually and collectively. Touch the moon by drawing on it – a vision, doodle, statement, a greeting, thought. . . your drawing is a hinge between you, everyone else, and the universe.

By connecting in spaces for imagination – by determining what to share and how to share it – we can create a greater outcome. Through messages and non-verbal communication, in a language unique to each person, the collective work becomes a testament to personal freedom, creativity, and activity.

Celebrate with us the gathering of creative powers from around the globe to mark the passage from nothing to something and from thinking into doing. Savour this moment of transformation. Leave your fingerprint and see the shared moon grow as others reach out too. Let’s show the world that together our marks matter. Creativity defies boundaries.

Ideas, wind, and air no one can stop.

Quite an opportunity for a continuous exquisite corpse. But of course, every other doodle is bathroom graffiti.

Moon by Ai Weiwei & Olafur Eliasson.

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Clever application: a grid of SSD’s (y’know, the digital number 8) used as a lo-fi display and/or mirror.

Teehan+Lax Labs – D.I.G.I.T..

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Take a Kinect, capture topographic info and translate to a grid of fast-responding actuators to reproduce the 3d shape. Obviously limited to rolling landscape forms, but nice to see it in action. Basically, a robotic version of the classic pin-impression toy.

What if each column was made of individual cubes, and each cube could slide side-to-side in the XY plane? What if you made each column out of a flexible cable, able to be bent and manipulated by electric current?

inFORM from MIT’s Tangible Media Group.

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Sublime micro-sculptures made of mechanical junk. Looks like watch parts, silverware, other shiny bits. I could stare at these for hours. I used to take anchor bolts and turn them into giant machine guns for my GI Joes, but those pale in comparison to the intricacy of these bugs:

Muti-Valchev Dimitar Valchev on deviantART.

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